Blog

1912: Lieutenant Olle Dahlbeck flying in Kristiania (Oslo)

By:      Rob Mulder For:    www.europeanairlines.no In 1912 the Swedish aviator Olle Dahlbeck came to Kristiania (now Oslo) to fly with his monoplane the Sommer F and his biplane the Bristol Boxkite for an enthusiastic Norwegian audience. He made several flights, among them the first flight in Norway with a female passenger. And Norway had another novelty: His monoplane Sommer F made its first flights in Norway! On 14 October 1910, the Swedish baron Carl Cederström made the first flight in Norway of a heavier-than-air craft. In 2010 this event was only marked with little attention. The big celebration will be...

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Breakfast in Oslo, lunch in Bergen, dinner in Oslo!

1935-2010: 75-year jubileeBy: Rob Mulder For: www.europeanairlines.no and www.hangar.no In June 2010, it was 75 years since the first flight between Oslo and Bergen was inaugurated by the newly formed airline Det Norske Luftfartselskap, Fred. Olsen & Bergenske AS - DNL. A look back at the organization and the first departure on a summer day in 1935. The entire distance between Oslo and Bergen was in 1935 650 km, when travelling along the coast. The Junkers Ju 52/3m-See, LN-DAE “Havørn”  in Bergen. (Wilhelm Ingolf Furre, Bergen) It was Rudolf Olsen, who took the initiative to start up a national airline....

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Lioré et Olivier H-24 with Air France

By: Gérard Hartmann Translation: Rob Mulder The seaplane LeO H-24 is the culmination of a brilliant series of studies undertaken at Lioré et Olivier first at Levallois and then Argenteuil by Marcel Riffard, Edmond Benoit, Paul Asancheeff, Jean Poitou, Stephi Konovaitchoukoff and Sébastienne Guyot. These studies lead to an ultramodern monoplane with an enclosed cabin accommodating ten passengers, and was to replace the small H-19 on Mediterranean routes of Air Union. Between 1929 and 1936 the project H-24 was revised several time and gives rise to a series of eight variants of remarkable seaplane. It was built in a total of...

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Fleet list of: Československa Státni Aerolinie – ČSA 1923-1939

Fleet list of Československa Státni Aerolinie - ČSA (1923-1939) By: Rob Mulder, www.europeanairlines.no We would like to receive information from the reader about the mistakes in this list. Abbreviations: B/u = Broken up Canx = cancelled from the register C/n = Constructor’s Number Dbr = Destroyed beyond repair F.u. = Fate unknown In = Date aircraft was taken in use / or registered Regn = Registration   Type Regn. Name Regn. c/n In Fate   <1929 > 1930 Regn. 1) Aero A-10 L-BALB 3 27.02.23 16.4.28 canx. Aero A-10 L-BALC 2 27.02.23 16.4.28 canx. Aero A-10 L-BALD 1 27.02.23 3.11.25...

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Norway Air Express

By: Rob Mulder For: www.europeanairlines.no A long wait In August 1919 the Dutch lieutenant Albert Plesman (founder of Royal Dutch KLM) met with the management of the Norwegian airline company Det Norske Luftfartrederi A/S - DNL and they discussed the possibility to establish an air service between the Netherlands and Norway in cooperation with the other IATA-members. Unfortunately, DNL went brook and until 1933 not much more happened. In the twenties of the last century the Norwegian Captain Wilhelm Meisterlin functioned as personal member of IATA representing Norway. Since 1927 the KLM discussed the possibilities with several Norwegian parties. [caption...

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Mr Batts flies in Norway

By: Rob Mulder For: www.europeanairlines.no Behind this curious title lies the history of the American aviator Carl Truman Batts, who on behalf of the American Curtiss Company arrived in April 1919 in Bergen, Norway to fly one of the products of the Curtiss Company, the Curtiss MF Seagull, the post-war version of the successful Curtiss MF flying boat. Here is the story of his stay in Norway. During his stay in Norway he made numerous flights and visited cities like Tønsberg, Kristiansand, Stavanger, Bergen, Kristiania and Hamar. The Norwegians, who referred to him as ”Mr Batts”, just loved him and...

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Latvijas Gaisa Satiksmes Akciju Sabiedríba (1922-1928)

By: Rob Mulder For: www.europeanairlines.no After the struggle for independence ended in 1920, Latvia started as so many other European countries after the Great War, to rebuild its country. It supported in the beginning mainly on co-operation with Germany as Latvia saw Germany as a liberator of the country from the Russians and because of the historical ties. The foundation of the Latvijas Gaisa Satiksmes Akciju Sabiedríba was therefore not surprisingly supported by Germany or more directly by the Junkers Flugzeugwerk AG (Jfa) from Dessau, eager to find ways to avoid destruction of its fleet of Junkers F 13 and...

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KLM and the Fokker F.II and F.III

By: Rob Mulder For: www.europeanairlines.no The Fokker F.II was the first of a long range of aircraft that KLM purchased from the Nederlandsche Vliegtuigfabriek NV (Fokker) before the Second World War. KLM had opened its first air service on May 17, 1920 with leased British aircraft, but ordered in July 1920 the first Fokker F.IIs. The fleet was within two years extended by the new Fokker F.IIIs. In this article we give a short introduction of both aircraft. This article is the second version. The first version has been taken down from the internet after just one day since the...

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Farman F.121 Jabiru in Danish service

By: Rob Mulder For: www.europeanairlines.no John Stroud wrote in his book “European Transport Aircraft since 1910” that the Farman F.121 Jabiru (Stork) was “…one of the ugliest transport aeroplanes ever built”. He probably wrote this with a smile on his face. But in a way the F-3X and perhaps even more the three-engine version F-4X were not the best looking aircraft, but they were used on air services for some years. Four of them were even used in Denmark. This story is about speed, prestige and safety. The prototype Farman F-3X Jabiru The prototype, F-3X was a high-wing strut-braced monoplane...

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AB Aerotransport and the Junkers G 24

By: Rob Mulder For: www.europeanairlines.no One of the most important aircraft factories of the period before 1945 was the Junkers Flugzeugwerk AG – Jfa. It produced the first useable all-metal aircraft. The first all-metal fighters were already constructed during the Great War (1914-1918) and after the war Junkers continued to develop military and civil aircraft of all-metal construction. Famous is the three-engined series of civil aircraft: Junkers Ju 252, Junkers Ju 52/3m, Junkers G 31 and Junkers G 24. Latter aircraft has been widely used by the Swedish airline company AB Aerotransport (AB standing for Aktiebolag – Limited company). AB...

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