International

Junkers Ju 52/3m – Success beyond the Luftwaffe

I have been interviewed by Christian Kamhaug for their Podcast called flypodden.no. The interview starts at the 40th minutt: Junkers Ju 52/3m - Success beyond the Luftwaffe [caption id="attachment_3151" align="alignleft" width="367"] This iconic thrre-engined aircraft deserved this book with a main focus on the non-Luftwaffe operators, both civil and military. But also the operation of the military type in Germany before 1935 has been described.[/caption]

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FLYING WITH MY PHOTOS – A Selection Of Photographs From The Period 1918-1940

Well, it is about time to announce a very special book. On February 3, 2012 the company European Airlines Rob Mulder celebrated its fifth birthday! A jubilee. For this occasion we published a small book with the catching title: "Flying With My Photos - A Selection Of Photographs From The Period 1918-1940". This is a book with only photographs of European airliners from the period 1918 to 1940. 76 pages with 63 beautiful photographs. To mention some: Caproni Ca.48, Breguet 14T2, Vickers Vimy Commercial, Fokker F.III, Junkers F 13, Farman F.190, Laté 28, De Havilland D.H.34, Handley Page W.8b, Dornier...

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SKYWRITING – MR. BRAMSON ABOVE CHRISTIANIA (OSLO)

By:         Rob J.M. Mulder For:        www.europeanairlines.no In 1923 the Internationella Luftfartsutställningen i Göteborg (ILUG), the International Aero Exhibition in Gothenburg, was a great success. It was the first big international event after the ELTA - The First Aviation Exhibition Amsterdam, held in 1919. One of the events was the skywriting (1) of Mr. Bramson in the sky above the Swedish harbor city. After the visit to Gothenburg, he travelled to Copenhagen, Malmö and Christiania (since 1925 known as Oslo) for more demonstrations of skywriting. Here is the story of his visit to Christiania. Read more about the ELTA  -“Is it...

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STAR and the Nieuport-Delage 641

By: Rob Mulder and in co-operation with Robert Espérou and Régis Biaux For: www.europeanairlines.no A small airliner for a small airline company was the Nieuport-Delage 641, also known as Ni-D 641. This high-winged single-engine aircraft saw limited service in France and operated two international air services for the Société de Transports Aériens Rapide - STAR. Here is a short review of the use of the aircraft in France. The firm Société Anonyme des Établissements Nieuport But first a short review over the production of civil airliners constructed by the Société Anonyme des Établissements Nieuport. Edouard de Nieport, commonly known as...

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Air Cargo a la Junkers

Air Express Co Ltd, Luftfrako and Deutramp By: Rob Mulder For: www.europeanairlines.no With the introduction of civil aviation at the end of the Great War (1914-1918) the aircraft started to find implant in the transportation of airmail and cargo. The trade and industry were not yet ready for this new form of transportation and could at that moment not foresee the great impact the aircraft would have. Its potential payload was not recognized either. But that would soon change. The story here is about the Trost Brothers and their co-operation with Junkers Flugzeugwerk AG and the German Junkers-affiliated air brokers...

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The Birth of Air Transport

By: Rob Mulder For: www.europeanairlines.no The informative and unfortunately short-lived aviation magazine “The Putnam Aeronautical Review” published in its issue of October 1989 an article from the hand of John Stroud. In this article he deals with the question that was first to open an air service and which qualifications were made in order to establish who was first. We would like to extend the information to the readers by adding a detailed review over all European countries and which airline company was the first in that country. Qualification explained But first of all we would like to repeat some...

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The “Junkers Spitzbergen Expedition” (1923)

By: Rob Mulder For: www.europeanairlines.no In 1923 Roald Amundsen attempted to fly from Wainwright, Alaska (USA) across the North Pole to the islands of Spitsbergen. Amundsen’s friend Consul Haakon Hammar and Junkers propaganda director Friedrich Andreas Fischer von Poturzyn organised a relief party to help in case Amundsen’s aircraft would not complete the flight. But Roald Amundsen had to cancel the flight due to problems with the Junkers JL-6. Roald Amundsens failed polar flight In the USA the Junkers Larsen JL-6 had proven itself on numerous long distance flights, among them one in October 1920 from New York to Los...

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