Norway

Royal Capital Tour with ‘Raceren’

In 1920, Tancred Ibsen started an airline called AS Aero. He purchased, among others, a Hansa Brandenburg W29, registered it as N.5 and was soon nick-named 'Raceren' - the racer. Ibsen had a good relationship with the newspapers in Norway. Of course, there was a win-win-situation, as he benefited from publicity in the newspaper about him and his seaplanes, and the newspaper had good stories to write about. The national newspaper Aftenposten came up with a good idea. In July, the newspaper asked Ibsen, if he was interested in making a bet: tour within 24 hours along the royal capitals...

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The shortest visit to Norway ever: 29 minutes!

[caption id="attachment_3690" align="aligncenter" width="544"] Messerschmitt Bf 108-B1 D-ICNN which arrived at Kjeller on 10 August 1037[/caption] It left as fast as it arrived. On a lovely Summer day, 10 August 1937, at 1230, a small blue plane came down from the sky and landed nicely and fast on Kjeller’s green grass. After filling up 200 liters of fuel, the aircraft disappeared just as fast. It was at Kjeller for exactly 29 minutes. It must have been the shortest visit to Norway?! What kind of flight was this? It was a Messerschmitt Bf 108 B-1S Taifun - a German one-engine low-wing...

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John Bochkon – A true Norwegian hero

  [caption id="attachment_3630" align="aligncenter" width="229"] Photograph of John Bochkon. (via Hans Olav Løkken)[/caption] Sometimes you have to go through your papers and clean up and throw away some stuff. This time, I found a nice article by the hand of Hans Olav Løkken about an attempt to cross the North Atlantic, which ended with the death of Clyde Allan Lee and John Bochkon. The reason to mention this attempt is that the John was Norwegian and had a flying certificate issued by Orville Wright. He was born in Trondheim (Norway) on 8 March 1904. Due to sickness, he did not...

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The first air mail flight of Naval Ltn Sven Brun ended upside-down

[caption id="attachment_3585" align="aligncenter" width="792"] The Supermarine Channel of the Marinens Flyvåpen (Naval Royal Air Corps)seconds before it crashed! (Nasjonalbiblioteket)[/caption] On the first flight on 12 July 1920, Naval Ltn Sven Brun departed with Supermarine Channel I, F.38, from Horten and flew to Christiania. Here the mail was taken on board. Immediately after take-off from Christiania, the flying-boat crashed and was destroyed beyond repair. On board was the journalist Leif Sinding from the newspaper ‘Morgenbladet’ and he wrote a long article about the accident and how he experienced it. The accident was described as follows: ”When we boarded the ‘aeroplane’ the...

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The day the first Lufthansa Junkers Ju 52/3m arrived in Norway

[caption id="attachment_3576" align="aligncenter" width="538"] The first Lufthansa Junkers Ju 52/3m to arrive in Oslo was D-ABIS "Kurt Wolff" with Joseph Kaspar as captain.[/caption] In 1934, just before the opening of the air service to Oslo, Lufthansa decided to introduce the Junkers Ju 52/3m officially to the Norwegian public. Flugkapitän Joseph Kaspar flew the company’s float-equipped Ju 52/3m, D-ABIS "Kurt Wolff" on Thursday, 26 April 1934, at 1745, for the first time to Oslo. He had departed from Travemünde for Copenhagen and continued 1245 to Gothenburg. Kaspar had his cabin filled with guests: Dr. Dierbach (DLH), Dr. Pinagel (chief of press at...

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THE TRIAL AIR MAIL SERVICE CHRISTIANIA – KRISTIANSAND (1920)

(Photo: Marinemuseum, Horten) By: Odd Arnesen and Rob Mulder (1) For: www.europeanairlines.no In 1920, Norway was at the breach of a new era. The First World War and the first post-war years had given the country much prosperity, and at the beginning of 1920 it did not look to be different year. Det Norske Luftfartrederiet A/S had applied for a concession for different national and international air services and was to be awarded a concession for the trial service Bergen – Haugesund – Stavanger. This route was opened in August 1920. Meanwhile, the Marinens Flyvevåpen (Naval Air Services) and Hærens...

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Junkers Ju 52/3m in Norway (1935-1946)

By: Rob J. M. Mulder For www.europeanairlines.no   The general history of the Junkers Ju 52/3m is well-known. After the first flight of the aircraft in March 1932, it took three year before the first Ju 52/3m was delivered to Norway. The first customers in Scandinavia were Sweden and Finland. In April 1935, the Norwegian airline Det Norske Luftfartselskap, Fred. Olsen & Bergenske A/S (DNL) was awarded a State subsidy and concession for national and international air service for a period of ten years. The problem was that aircraft deliveries took some months, so the company was in danger not...

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Timeline of civil Aviation in Norway up to 1945

By: Rob Mulder Rob Mulder has compiled this timeline of civil aviation in Norway. We have tried to publish as many facts as possible. In the period prior to the Great War (better known as the First World War, 1914-1918) many of the aviation events that took place in Norway were organised by the military. These have been taken up in the timeline if they were significant for the development of Norwegian civil aviation. Timeline of civil Aviation in Norway up to 1945

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1934: A MUCH WANTED AIR ROUTE OPENED

By: Rob Mulder For: European Airlines On 18 June 1934, the Norwegian airline Widerøe’s Flyveselskap A/S (Widerøe’s Air Line Co. Ltd.) started up the air service Oslo – Kristiansand – Stavanger – Haugesund. It was the first passenger, freight and mail service in Norway since the airline Det Norske Luftfartederi A/S flew the coastal route Bergen – Haugesund – Stavanger back in 1920. The 1934-results on the WIF air service were promising. On 19 February 1934, Viggo and Arild Widerøe and engineer Einar Isdahl formed the Widerøe’s Flyveselskap A/S (WIF). The capital was just 25,000 Norwegian Kroner. During 1934, Helge...

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The Master of Sempill in Norway

By:         Rob Mulder From:    www.europeanairlines.no and www.hangar.no During the twenties and thirties of the last century it happened regularly that foreign pilots came in their aircraft to Norway for a visit. Many of these visits are until recently been unknown to most of us, but as more archives are visited more details emerge. This story started when I found a picture in the papers of the Norwegian Captain Johan Høver. The picture showed a British registered aircraft on floats with a text on the back: "Puss Moth - Capt Master of Semphill – who arrived this morning". Captain...

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