**Italian Icon – The History of Alitalia and Antecedents

SALES START IN JANUARY 2024

kr 489.00

Categories: ,

Book Details

Author:

Günter Endres

Format:

234 pages, letter format, 299 color and black-and-white photographsz

Language:

English

Publisher:

Endres & Hobster

ISBN:

978-0-9573744-5-4

Price:

NOK 485,- + p.p.
Local VAT or custom charges not included

About The Author

Günter Endres

Günter Endres

Fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society, many published books and articles on civil aviation, editor for Flight World Airline Directory and for Jane’s IDEX, DSEi, Eurosatory and SOFEX show daily magazines, desk editor for Aviation International News magazines at air shows. Contributor to leading aviation magazines Awards: Aerospace Journalist of the Year 2000 and 2006.

He has written numerous books, among them books about the Junkers F 13, W33/W34, and G24/G31 together with Rob J. M. Mulder and Lennart Andersson.

Politics has shaped Italy’s air transport development in the inter-war years with the rise of Benito Mussolini’s Partido Nazionale Fascista (National Fascist Party) essentially controlling development. Although several airlines began operations in 1926, these were soon amalgamated into a single government airline, Ala Littoria, in 1934, conceived as Mussolini’s showcase of the new Italy and to serve his short-lived colonial expansion around the Mediterranean and the Red Sea. Only Avio Linee Italiane (ALI), controlled by the powerful Fiat empire, refused to be swallowed up and retained its independence. After 1945, Alitalia and Linee Aeree Italiane (LAI) became the two main airlines until a forced merger in 1957 left Alitalia the sole flag-carrier. After a relatively measured start in 1946 and the ‘golden age’ of the 1950s and 1960s, the state-owned airline staggered from crisis to crisis through state interference, mismanagement, a bloated workforce, powerful unions and failed partnerships, which led to its eventual demise in 2021.

The book details all the airlines that preceded Alitalia with complete photographic coverage and fleet lists, and goes on to examine in detail Alitalia’s vicissitudes, again with full photographic coverage, fleet lists, and more.